Catch the Moment

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In order to catch a ball, you make calculations and calibrations before the ball is in your hands, and then wait for the ball to arrive. It’s in these calculations -- before the ball arrives -- that the accuracy of the catch is determined. This is the same as a moment of life -- you set yourself up to “catch” each moment with the preparations of your expectations. The arrival of the ball appears as a moment -- it constructs the perception of motion through space; this motion in space constructs the sensation of time; then time constructs your memory; your memory imagines improvements, and the improvements ultimately build accuracy into your “catch” of life. These cycles are born and reborn as your ability and mastery ultimately unfold from non-mastery. There are moments when the absolute is absolutely everything, and then there are moments when absolutely nothing is absolutely necessary. Mastery understands these good and bad cycles are just angles of the unfolding moments . . . not forcing it, but by accepting it. Passing through your moments can sadden and depress you if you try to force life to be a particular “ball” in each “catch.” But when you’re flexible in your acceptance . . . you can find joy in these cycles . . . you can set yourself up in the field of your life, and with each ball that arrives as a moment, improve upon your sensation of the time. When you stop confronting the world around you with old expectations, it will offer new moments in your presence. This is the power of “catching” moments . . . never living in the past, but improving on the past by allowing the future to arrive in your hands. Mastery is continuously improving each moment; whether the moment is good or bad, there’s always another “catch.” Our prayer is that you allow each moment to arrive; catch it -- make improvements on it -- allow the next one to arrive more magnificently; make improvements upon your improvements and master the moments . . . this is the game of life . . . this is the real “catch” . . .